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HMCS Vancouver ends relief operations in earthquake-stricken New Zealand

Photo by Martin Luff on flickr

After the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that shook New Zealand on November 14, the Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Vancouver finally completed its relief operations on the South Island.

The HMCS Vancouver helped in the evacuation of people at Kaikoura, emergency supplies delivery, and infrastructure repair, in its effort to support the New Zealand Defence Force.

It evacuated around 900 people, delivered over 216 tonnes of emergency supplies and food.

Its contributions to relief operations underscored the commitment of Canada in aiding international partners and in acting as a “force for good in the world.”

“The men and women aboard HMCS Vancouver provided valuable assistance to our friends in New Zealand and bolstered relief efforts for the people affected by the earthquake. I commend HMCS Vancouver’s sailors and embarked air detachment for responding quickly to assist the people of New Zealand,” Lieutenant-General Steve Bowes, commander of the Canadian Joint Operations Command, said in a statement.

During the time of said earthquake, the HCMS Vancouver was around the vicinity of Auckland, NZ for the preparation of a goodwill visit in celebration of the 75th anniversary of NZ’ Naval Forces alongside other allied naval forces.

Following the Government of New Zealand’s request, it diverted to the affected region for relief operations.

It worked with Her Majesty’s New Zealand Ship (HMNZS) Te Kaha and HMNZS Endeavour, Her Majesty’s Australian Ship Darwin, and United States Ship Sampson to assist people affected by the said NZ earthquake.

 

About Wired Correspondence (185 Articles)
WIRED CORRESPONDENCE is an online newsmagazine managed by freelance journalists and editors. This is our attempt to break into online journalism, initially covering general news around the world. Our main focus in the near future, however, is to report under-covered or under-reported social issues in the Philippines and elsewhere through narrative, long-form journalism. We aim to help through storytelling.

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